italian stuffed mushrooms

April 17, 2010 | 1 comment

mine

I am so lucky to have a husband that lets me make and consume mushrooms as often as I want. He doesn’t know this yet, but  I am considering going vegetarian for mushrooms. When I find recipes that mention mushrooms, they are immediately marked and added to my endless compilation of “Make ME!!” recipes. I have limited myself in sharing with you all the wonderful dishes that feature mushrooms because, though I hate to think this, I’m sure not everyone is having a steamy affair with mushrooms like I am.

sun dried tomatoplenty of basil
bakedbacon

I am so crazy-go-nuts for them that I have literally gone wild! I have replaced meat with mushrooms, which is even hard for me to swallow since I am a self-proclaimed, die-hard, meat-loving carnivore, and have  found excuses to even throw them into the folds of melted cheese and pasta. And as I have tried not to overload you with a vegetable that even I don’t like to admit is called “fungus”, I can’t conceal my excitement in sharing my very own stuffed mushroom recipe.


stuffed

I am particularly proud of this recipe because I consider it to be my first creation. The fact that this tastes good is nothing short of a cooking miracle. I feel I deserve a pat on the back, and I’ll take a chest bump too — ok, maybe not the last one, but that is how strongly I feel about these mushrooms. In doing research I ran across many recipes with big promises of flavor. Nothing suited me — the mention of fennel and dill turns my stomach and blue cheese is not my first choice. Which is why I choose a combination of sun-dried tomatoes, bacon, basil and two different cheeses.

little mushroom

Placing these in your mouth produces an uncontrollable eyebrow raise. Thoughtless chewing slows to meditation as new, previously un-experienced flavors zap your palette. Small, dainty, colorful and loaded, they are gourmet enough to please the most overly cultured crowd, but can also be popped like candy. When you make these be sure to eat a few before placing them on the table. I served them and stepped out of the room for no more than 30 seconds. Upon returning they were all gone — not a single shaving of cheese was left on the plate.

itsy bitsy

Italian Stuffed Mushrooms

Makes about 40 hors d’oeuvres

2 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 pounds baby portabello mushrooms, stems removed
1/2 cup finely chopped sun-dried tomatoes*
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 cup freshly grated fontina or mozzarella cheese
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/4 cup minced fresh basil
1/4 cup minced fresh parsley
1/4 cup fine dry bread crumbs
5 pieces cooked bacon, chopped finely
1 egg yolk, lightly beaten

* I used ready to eat sun-dried tomatoes and put them right into the mix. If using tomatoes packed in oil, drain them first.

Preheat oven to 400°F.

In a lightly greased glass baking dish lay mushrooms stem side down.* Bake for approximately 10 minutes or until they have released their liquid, there should be about 1/4 cup of liquid. Remove mushrooms from oven and place mushrooms on a paper towel to soak up excess liquid. Pour off liquid in the baking pan into a mixing bowl.

In a small skillet over medium heat, melt butter and add tomatoes and garlic. Cook until garlic releases flavor and is softened, about 2 – 3 minutes. Add tomato mixture to the mushroom liquid. Add basil, parsley, bread crumbs, bacon, yolk, both cheeses and salt and pepper to taste. Stir until evenly combined.

Return mushrooms to baking dish and turn them over so the stem side is facing up. Gently mound the stuffing into the caps. Sprinkle the mushrooms with more Parmesan and bake in the middle of the oven for 15 minutes.

Once cooked, take mushrooms out of the oven and sprinkle again with cheese. Arrange on serving dish and serve warm.

Conversions & Equivalents

Volume | Baking | Metric | Pan Size | Temperature | Oven | Other

1/2 teaspoon = 30 drops
1 teaspoon = 1/3 tablespoon OR 60 drops
3 teaspoon = 1 tablespoon or 1/2 fluid ounce
1/2 tablespoon = 1 1/2 teaspoons
1 tablespoon = 3 teaspoons or 1/2 fluid ounce
2 tablespoons = 1/8 cup or 1 fluid ounce
3 tablespoons = 1 1/2 fluid ounces
4 tablespoons = 1 1/4 cup or 2 fluid ounces
5 1/3 tablespoons = 1/3 cup or 5 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon
8 tablespoons = 1/2 cup or 4 fluid ounces
10 2/3 tablespoons = 2/3 cup or 10 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons
12 tablespoons = 3/4 cup or 6 fluid ounces
16 tablespoons = 1 cup or 8 fluid ounces or 1/2 pint
1/8 cup = 2 tablespoons or 1 fluid ounce
1/4 cup = 4 tablespoons or 2 fluid ounces
1/3 cup = 5 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon
3/8 cup = 1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons
1/2 cup = 8 tablespoons or 4 fluid ounces
2/3 cup = 10 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons
5/8 cup = 1/2 cup + 2 teaspoons
3/4 cup = 12 tablespoons or 6 fluid ounces
7/8 cup = 3/4 cup + 2 tablespoons
1 cup = 16 tablespoons or 1/2 pint or 8 fluid ounces
2 cups = 1 pint or 16 fluid ounces
1 pint = 2 cups or 16 fluid ounces
1 quart = 2 pints or 4 cups or 32 fluid ounces
1 gallon = 4 quarts or 8 pints or 16 cups or 128 fluid ounces
FLOUR
1 cup all-purpose flour = 5 ounces or 142 grams
1 cup cake flour = 4 ounces or 113 grams
1 cup whole wheat flour = 5 1/2 ounces or 156 grams
SUGAR
1 cup granulated white sugar = 7 ounces or 198 grams
1 cup packed brown sugar = 7 ounces or 198 grams
1 cup confectioners sugar = 4 ounces or 113 grams
COCOA POWDER
1 cup cocoa powder = 3 ounces or 85 grams
BUTTER
4 tablespoons = 1/2 stick or 1/4 cup or 2 ounces
8 tablespoons = 1 stick or 1/2 cup or 4 ounces
16 tablespoons = 2 sticks or 1 cup or 8 ounces
32 tablespoons = 4 sticks or 2 cups or 1 pound
1/4 teaspoon = 1.23 milliliters
1/2 teaspoon = 2.46 milliliters
3/4 teaspoon = 3.7 milliliters
1 teaspoon = 4.93 milliliters
1 1/4 teaspoon = 6.16 milliliters
1 1/2 teaspoon = 7.39 milliliters
1 3/4 teaspoon = 8.63 milliliters
2 teaspoon = 9.86 milliliters
1 tablespoon = 14.79 milliliters
2 tablespoons = 29.57 milliliters
1/4 cup = 59.15 milliliters
1/2 cup = 118.3 milliliters
1 cup = 236.59 milliliters
2 cups or 1 pint = 473.18 milliliters
3 cups = 709.77 milliliters
4 cups or 1 quart = 946.36 milliliters
1/4 teaspoon = 1.23 milliliters
4 quarts or 1 gallon = 3.785 liters
PAN SIZE VOLUME CAN SUBSTITUTE WITH
1 8-inch round cake pan 4 cups

1 8x4-inch loaf pan

1 9-inch round cake pan

1 9-inch pie plate

2 8-inch round cake pans 8 cups

2 8x4-inch loaf pans

1 9-inch tube pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

1 11x7-inch baking dish

1 10-inch springform pan

1 9-inch round cake pan 6 cups

1 8-inch round cake pan

1 8x4-inch loaf pan

1 11x7-inch baking dish

2 9-inch round cake pans 12 cups

2 8x4-inch loaf pans

1 9-inch tube pan

2 8-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 11x7-inch baking dish

1 10-inch springform pan

1 10-inch round cake pan 11 cups

2 8-inch round cake pan

1 9-inch tube pan

1 10-inch springform pan

2 10-inch round cake pans 22 cups

5 8-inch round cake pans

3 or 4 9-inch round cake pans

2 10-inch spring form pan

9-inch tube pan 12 cups

2 8-inch round cake pans

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

10-inch tube pans 16 cups

3 9-inch round cake pans

2 10-inch pie plates

4 8-inch pie plates

2 9x5-inch loaf pans

2 8-inch square baking dishes

2 9-inch square baking dishes

10-inch bundt pan 12 cups

1 9x13-inch baking dish

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 9-inch tube pan

2 11x7-inch baking dishes

1 10-inch springform pan

11x7x2-inch baking dish 6 cups

1 8-inch square baking dish

1 9-inch square baking dish

1 9-inch round cake pan

9x13x2-inch baking dish 15 cups

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

3 8-inch round cake pans

1 10x15-inch jellyroll pan

10x15x1-inch jellyroll pan 15 cups

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

2 8-inch round cake pan

1 9x13-inch baking dish

9x5-inch loaf pan 8 cups

1 10-inch pie plate pan

1 8-inch square baking dish

1 9-inch square baking dish

8x4-inch loaf pan 6 cups

1 8-inch round cake pan

1 11x7-inch baking dish

9-inch springform pan 10 cups

1 10-inch round cake pan

1 10-inch spring form pan

2 8-inch round cake pans

2 9-inch round cake pans

10-inch springform pan 12 cups

2 8x4-inch loaf pan

1 9-inch tube pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 11x7-inch baking dishes

2 8-inch round cake pans

8-inch square baking dish 8 cups

1 9x5-inch loaf pan

2 8-inch pie plates

9-inch square baking dish 8 cups

1 11x7-inch baking dish

1 9x5-inch loaf pan

2 8-inch pie plate

Water Freezes 32°F 0°C
  40°F 4.4°C
  50°F 10°C
  60°F 15.6°C
  70°F 21.1°C
  80°F 26.7°C
  90°F 32.2°C
  100°F 37.8°C
  110°F 43.3°C
  120°F 48.9°C
  130°F 54.4°C
  140°F 60°C
  150°F 65.6°C
  160°F 71.1°C
  170°F 76.7°C
  180°F 82.2°C
  190°F 87.8°C
  200°F 93.3°C
Water Boils 212°F 100°C
  250°F 121°C
  300°F 149°C
  350°F 177°C
  400°F 205°C
  450°F 233°C
  500°F 260°C
275°F = 140°C or Gas Mark 1
300°F = 150°C or Gas Mark 2
325°F = 165°C or Gas Mark 3
350°F = 180°C or Gas Mark 4
375°F = 190°C or Gas Mark 5
400°F = 200°C or Gas Mark 6
425°F = 220°C or Gas Mark 7
450°F = 230°C or Gas Mark 9
475°F = 240°C or Gas Mark 10

And for conversions that are not listed I found a great conversion calculator here!

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  1. These look amazing. I love mushrooms too and try to sneak them into everything. My husband isn’t all that thrilled, but he’s a good sport about it. I can’t wait to try these out at my next dinner party!

 

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