linguine and clams with garlic white wine sauce

August 30, 2010 | 15 comments

linguine and clams

I have come to the conclusion that Anne Burrell’s food looks so good because a) I am starving when watching her Secrets to Becoming A Restaurant Chef, b) I am invested in her dah-ling chicken thighs and must know if they will in fact be the supastar she says they will be in her coq au vin, or c) her food looks that good because it is that good, and well people, there was only one way to find out. Out of the sixteen episodes I have saved as “Do not delete until I say so, or I will chop off your thumbs!” I randomly chose her linguine and clam recipe — the fact that the seafood market had the exact little neck clams that her recipe required helped that random selection as well.

garliclittle neck clams

I entered into Chef Anne mode without the slightest hesitation, calling my little clams dah-lings while scrubbing off the sand and telling my garlic it had fulfilled its garlic destiny as I removed the brown shards from the hot oil. Seriously, people, talking to your food works!

ready for a scrubba-dub-dubclams cooked in white wine

And though I bow down to Chef Anne and all her kitchen gloriousness, I still felt the need to put a Chef Meg stamp on the dish. I read complaints that she added cheese to a seafood dish, oh the horror! Puh-lease! Cheese makes all things taste good, if not better, and that is not negotiable….baby! So needless to say, I added the cheese without a second thought, and the cheese not only made it taste better, but it helped the sauce to thicken and stick to the pasta. Without such stickage you will end up with pasta sitting in thin soupy sauce, and that will not do.

Back to my Chef Meg stampage — I used twice the amount of wine and nixed the water. Yep, I lika the booze. It dun taste goooood! My second little sneaky sneak was leaving the minced garlic in the oil the second time I boiled the clams. The pasta was tender and the garlic infused boozy sauce was excellent, meaning answer C was in fact the correct conclusion. Though I can honestly say, even after I eat a huge Thanksgiving meal and sit down to watch her cook I will be immediately starving and honestly, I dare you not to say “Brown food tastes good” when browning your food. Her food is absolutely irresistible. BTB-RTS out.

linguine and clams with garlic white wine sauce

Linguine and Clams with Garlic White Wine Sauce
Adapted from Anne Burrell

Serves 6

Anne Note: Purchase shellfish that’s sold in mesh bags. If you buy clams or mussels that are in plastic bags, you may be getting dead shellfish. The plastic makes them suffocate.

10 cloves garlic, smashed
5 dozen little neck clams, scrubbed under cold running water
2 cups white wine
2 large pinches of crushed red pepper flakes
1 pound linguine
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 tablespoons chopped Italian parsley, plus additional for garnish
2 tablespoons chopped fresh oregano leaves, plus additional for garnish
1 cup finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano, optioinal
Kosher salt (I did not need any)

Coat a large saute pan (I used a 6 quart stock pot, as she does on the show) with olive oil and add 5 garlic cloves and a pinch of red pepper flakes. Bring pan to medium high heat and cook until garlic becomes golden brown. (Meg note: I happen to love garlic and flipped the smashed garlic over to brown on the other side, wanting to get as much garlic flavor as I could.) When garlic is golden brown and very aromatic, remove it and discard (it has fulfilled its garlic destiny). Put 3 1/2 dozen clams in the pan and add the wine. Cover the pan a bring to a boil over medium heat. Cover and cook until the clams open up, about 10 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, remove the clams from the pan and set aside. Pour the cooking liquid into a measuring cup and set aside.

Bring a large pot of water to a boil over medium heat. (Meg note: I usually salt my pasta water, but the cooking liquid was on the salty side so I skipped, figuring it is easier to add the salt in later than take it out.)

Mince remaining smashed garlic cloves. Coat same saute pan again with olive oil and add garlic and another pinch of red pepper flakes. Bring pan to medium-high heat and cook garlic for a minute or two (don’t let it get brown). Add the remaining raw clams and reserved clam cooking liquid to the pan. When adding the liquid, be sure to check for sand and grit in the bottom, you may lose the last couple of tablespoons of juice but that is better than sand in your pasta! (Meg note: even though I followed the directions, next time I might strain the juice through a paper towel lined sieve to make sure all of the sand and grit is out, before adding it back into the pan.) Cover and cook until the clams open.

While clams are cooking, drop the linguine into the salted boiling water and cook until the pasta is very “al dente” – maybe a minute or so less than the box directs.

Remove the cooked clams in their shells from the pan and keep warm. Add the butter and cooked clams that have been removed from their shells back to the pan. Bring the liquid to a boil and toss in the cooked pasta and the herbs. Cook the pasta together with the sauce until the sauce clings to the pasta. Turn off the heat and toss in the grated parmigian-reggiano, if using. Stir vigorously to combine.

Divide the pasta into serving dishes and garnish with clams that are still in their shells and some chopped herbs.

Conversions & Equivalents

Volume | Baking | Metric | Pan Size | Temperature | Oven | Other

1/2 teaspoon = 30 drops
1 teaspoon = 1/3 tablespoon OR 60 drops
3 teaspoon = 1 tablespoon or 1/2 fluid ounce
1/2 tablespoon = 1 1/2 teaspoons
1 tablespoon = 3 teaspoons or 1/2 fluid ounce
2 tablespoons = 1/8 cup or 1 fluid ounce
3 tablespoons = 1 1/2 fluid ounces
4 tablespoons = 1 1/4 cup or 2 fluid ounces
5 1/3 tablespoons = 1/3 cup or 5 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon
8 tablespoons = 1/2 cup or 4 fluid ounces
10 2/3 tablespoons = 2/3 cup or 10 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons
12 tablespoons = 3/4 cup or 6 fluid ounces
16 tablespoons = 1 cup or 8 fluid ounces or 1/2 pint
1/8 cup = 2 tablespoons or 1 fluid ounce
1/4 cup = 4 tablespoons or 2 fluid ounces
1/3 cup = 5 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon
3/8 cup = 1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons
1/2 cup = 8 tablespoons or 4 fluid ounces
2/3 cup = 10 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons
5/8 cup = 1/2 cup + 2 teaspoons
3/4 cup = 12 tablespoons or 6 fluid ounces
7/8 cup = 3/4 cup + 2 tablespoons
1 cup = 16 tablespoons or 1/2 pint or 8 fluid ounces
2 cups = 1 pint or 16 fluid ounces
1 pint = 2 cups or 16 fluid ounces
1 quart = 2 pints or 4 cups or 32 fluid ounces
1 gallon = 4 quarts or 8 pints or 16 cups or 128 fluid ounces
FLOUR
1 cup all-purpose flour = 5 ounces or 142 grams
1 cup cake flour = 4 ounces or 113 grams
1 cup whole wheat flour = 5 1/2 ounces or 156 grams
SUGAR
1 cup granulated white sugar = 7 ounces or 198 grams
1 cup packed brown sugar = 7 ounces or 198 grams
1 cup confectioners sugar = 4 ounces or 113 grams
COCOA POWDER
1 cup cocoa powder = 3 ounces or 85 grams
BUTTER
4 tablespoons = 1/2 stick or 1/4 cup or 2 ounces
8 tablespoons = 1 stick or 1/2 cup or 4 ounces
16 tablespoons = 2 sticks or 1 cup or 8 ounces
32 tablespoons = 4 sticks or 2 cups or 1 pound
1/4 teaspoon = 1.23 milliliters
1/2 teaspoon = 2.46 milliliters
3/4 teaspoon = 3.7 milliliters
1 teaspoon = 4.93 milliliters
1 1/4 teaspoon = 6.16 milliliters
1 1/2 teaspoon = 7.39 milliliters
1 3/4 teaspoon = 8.63 milliliters
2 teaspoon = 9.86 milliliters
1 tablespoon = 14.79 milliliters
2 tablespoons = 29.57 milliliters
1/4 cup = 59.15 milliliters
1/2 cup = 118.3 milliliters
1 cup = 236.59 milliliters
2 cups or 1 pint = 473.18 milliliters
3 cups = 709.77 milliliters
4 cups or 1 quart = 946.36 milliliters
1/4 teaspoon = 1.23 milliliters
4 quarts or 1 gallon = 3.785 liters
PAN SIZE VOLUME CAN SUBSTITUTE WITH
1 8-inch round cake pan 4 cups

1 8x4-inch loaf pan

1 9-inch round cake pan

1 9-inch pie plate

2 8-inch round cake pans 8 cups

2 8x4-inch loaf pans

1 9-inch tube pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

1 11x7-inch baking dish

1 10-inch springform pan

1 9-inch round cake pan 6 cups

1 8-inch round cake pan

1 8x4-inch loaf pan

1 11x7-inch baking dish

2 9-inch round cake pans 12 cups

2 8x4-inch loaf pans

1 9-inch tube pan

2 8-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 11x7-inch baking dish

1 10-inch springform pan

1 10-inch round cake pan 11 cups

2 8-inch round cake pan

1 9-inch tube pan

1 10-inch springform pan

2 10-inch round cake pans 22 cups

5 8-inch round cake pans

3 or 4 9-inch round cake pans

2 10-inch spring form pan

9-inch tube pan 12 cups

2 8-inch round cake pans

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

10-inch tube pans 16 cups

3 9-inch round cake pans

2 10-inch pie plates

4 8-inch pie plates

2 9x5-inch loaf pans

2 8-inch square baking dishes

2 9-inch square baking dishes

10-inch bundt pan 12 cups

1 9x13-inch baking dish

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 9-inch tube pan

2 11x7-inch baking dishes

1 10-inch springform pan

11x7x2-inch baking dish 6 cups

1 8-inch square baking dish

1 9-inch square baking dish

1 9-inch round cake pan

9x13x2-inch baking dish 15 cups

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

3 8-inch round cake pans

1 10x15-inch jellyroll pan

10x15x1-inch jellyroll pan 15 cups

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

2 8-inch round cake pan

1 9x13-inch baking dish

9x5-inch loaf pan 8 cups

1 10-inch pie plate pan

1 8-inch square baking dish

1 9-inch square baking dish

8x4-inch loaf pan 6 cups

1 8-inch round cake pan

1 11x7-inch baking dish

9-inch springform pan 10 cups

1 10-inch round cake pan

1 10-inch spring form pan

2 8-inch round cake pans

2 9-inch round cake pans

10-inch springform pan 12 cups

2 8x4-inch loaf pan

1 9-inch tube pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 11x7-inch baking dishes

2 8-inch round cake pans

8-inch square baking dish 8 cups

1 9x5-inch loaf pan

2 8-inch pie plates

9-inch square baking dish 8 cups

1 11x7-inch baking dish

1 9x5-inch loaf pan

2 8-inch pie plate

Water Freezes 32°F 0°C
  40°F 4.4°C
  50°F 10°C
  60°F 15.6°C
  70°F 21.1°C
  80°F 26.7°C
  90°F 32.2°C
  100°F 37.8°C
  110°F 43.3°C
  120°F 48.9°C
  130°F 54.4°C
  140°F 60°C
  150°F 65.6°C
  160°F 71.1°C
  170°F 76.7°C
  180°F 82.2°C
  190°F 87.8°C
  200°F 93.3°C
Water Boils 212°F 100°C
  250°F 121°C
  300°F 149°C
  350°F 177°C
  400°F 205°C
  450°F 233°C
  500°F 260°C
275°F = 140°C or Gas Mark 1
300°F = 150°C or Gas Mark 2
325°F = 165°C or Gas Mark 3
350°F = 180°C or Gas Mark 4
375°F = 190°C or Gas Mark 5
400°F = 200°C or Gas Mark 6
425°F = 220°C or Gas Mark 7
450°F = 230°C or Gas Mark 9
475°F = 240°C or Gas Mark 10

And for conversions that are not listed I found a great conversion calculator here!

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  1. Wow… that looks so pretty, must be delicious with all that garlic. yummm.

  2. What a beautiful post and this is one of my favorite dishes of all times, well anything to do with seafood…i’m there!!!
    in the mood for a whole lobster tonight :)
    thank you for your recipe, the xtra wine with the clams just make the juice xtra sweeter. nice touch,
    Lisa
    CookNg Sisters

  3. Hi! Thanks for the add!

    Your photos are gorgeous! I’m not a big clam fan, but my husband would love this recipe! I’d be happy with the lovely garlicky sauce and pasta!

    Thanks for sharing!

  4. Linguine with clams is one of my favourite meals. Yours looks utterly delicious. Thank you for the add at foodbuzz. I’m gonna continue reading your delicious posts now… The pulled pork also looks just yum!
    Have a great day. Michael

  5. Hi, Meg. Thanks for adding me on FoodBuzz. It is nice to meet you and keep on bloggin’!

    Do stay in touch,

    Dan

  6. i really like anne burrell. her recipes are great! this looks amazing!

  7. This recipe looks great – can’t wait to try it! And I agree with you, cheese makes everything taste better, LOL.

  8. Hey Meg, this clam pasta looks unbelievably delicious. I’ve actually been meaning to buy some clams and try another dish too, so I’m bookmarking this (smile).
    p.s. I lika the booze too;)

  9. Meg, I will definitely try this recipe! I always struggle with cheese on fish… Thanks for the add.

  10. That is one pretty dish of linguine and clams :) And a very cute post, fun…

  11. This recipe definitely looks like something I would like, and although I have cooked with mussels many times, I have never tried clams…. sounds like the time is now! :)

  12. I found your post online and made the dish last night. It was delicious and the whole family loved it. Thanks for sharing it online with the detailed instructions.

  13. You actually make it seem so easy together with your presentation however I find this matter to be actually one thing that I think I might never understand. It sort of feels too complicated and extremely large for me. I am looking ahead for your next submit, I’ll attempt to get the cling of it!

  14. Absolutely delicious!!!!! We enjoyed this Linguine and Clams recipe more than we could have imagined!!!! Better than any other!!! Used just a half pound of linguine for two people, had a freshly baked loaf of crusty bread for the sauce….soooo delicious!!! Thank you.

  15. I made this a couple of weeks ago. The onnois were absolutely fantastic, but I was really disappointed in the finished soup. I think the water washed away a lot of the depth of flavor and adding a splash of sherry didn’t improve the soup. I am going to make it again, but I think I am a person that enjoys the stock.

 

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