spiced sugar pumpkin doughnuts

October 20, 2010 | 9 comments

spiced sugar pumpkin doughnuts

I have logged an absurd number of hours in the kitchen this past week. It started off with a chocolate peanut butter cake sent off to compete against various other desserts, then continued with the planning and cooking of a mini appetizer feast for a certain parent’s fiftieth birthday party which had me on my feet for days as I cranked out three different kinds of strudel, walnut crostini, deviled eggs, candied nuts and of course a birthday cake and now I am slated to make yet another cake (three cakes in less than seven days — surely there is some law against this) for my best friend’s graduation party this weekend. Sadly I have no pictures of this week’s efforts, but you’ll have to trust me that it was worth my now aching feet, well after I get a pedicure it will all be worth it…

pumpkin

The only things I did manage to capture by way of camera were these doughnuts — did I forget to mention I made these too — which were definitely worth putting my feet through another day of standing on hard tile. They were surprisingly easy to make, though something about deep frying terrifies my arms and my heart and my arteries, but mainly my arms. After working with hot oil my arms somehow end up looking like they are diseased or came out of a horror flick with red splotches and burn spatters up and down. But they’re doughnuts, it’s worth it right?

ready for oil bathoil bath readyfresh from the fryer

Despite everything I have brought upon myself, these are undoubtedly the best thing that has passed through the kitchen this week — or perhaps I just really, really like fried dough, like a lot. The dough came together quickly and the cooking took less than 15 minutes, beginning to end. And the eating… well, faintly spiced, lightly pumpkin flavored, soft and cake-like texture dipped in spiced sugar, oh these are so very worth it.

spiced sugar pumpkin doughnutsdoughnut hole

Sugar Spiced Pumpkin Doughnuts
Adapted from Bon Apppetit

Makes 24 doughnuts + 24 doughnut holes

BA Note: Use a clip-on deep fry thermometer to gauge the oil temperature when frying these doughnuts: too low and they’ll absorb oil, turning leaden and soggy; too high and they’ll burn before the insides are cooked through.

Meg Note: I have it on good authority that solid shortening is preferred over oil when frying. It is believed that because shortening, unlike oil, is solid at room temperature, once your food has been fried and cooled, it seeps less oil into the stuff around it and will feel less greasy on the tongue. Myself, having an extreme abhorrence to shortening, used the oil method. There was no spitting or splattering of oil if you gently slide your doughnuts into the oil using a slotted spoon and if you keep your oil at the recommended temperature when frying and let your doughnuts sit and “de-grease” on a paper towel lined tray before submerging them in spiced sugar, they will not feel or taste greasy. If you do use shortening, add enough to a deep-sided pan to measure 1 1/2-inches. Using your candy thermometer, keep the temperature of the shortening between 365°F and 370°F.

3 1/2 cups all purpose flour
4 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
1 cup sugar
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
1 large egg
2 large egg yolks
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 cup plus one tablespoon buttermilk
1 cup pure pumpkin puree
Canola oil, for deep frying

Spiced Sugar Topping:
1 cup sugar
4 teaspoons ground cinnamon
2 teaspoons nutmeg

For spiced sugar: Whisk all ingredients in a medium bowl to blend.

For doughnuts: Whisk first 8 ingredients in a medium bowl to blend. Using an electric mixer, beat sugar and butter in a large bowl until blended (mixture will be grainy). Beat in egg, then yolks and vanilla. Gradually beat in buttermilk; beat in pumpkin in 4 additions. Using a rubber spatula, fold in dry ingredients in 4 additions, blending gently after each addition. Cover with plastic; chill for 3 hours.

Sprinkle 2 rimmed baking sheets lightly with flour. Roll out 1/3 of dough on a floured surface to 1/2 to 2/3-inch thickness. Using a 2 1/2-inch diameter round cutter, cut out dough rounds. Arrange on sheets. Repeat with remaining dough in 2 more batches. Gather dough scraps. Press out dough and cut out more dough rounds until all dough is used.

Using 1-inch diameter round cutter, cut out center of each dough round to make doughnuts and doughnut holes.

Line 2 baking sheets with several layers of paper towels. Pour oil into large deep skillet to depth of 1 1/2 inches. Attach deep fry thermometer and heat oil to 365°F to 370°F. Fry doughnut holes in 2 batches until golden brown, turning occasionally, about 2 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels to drain. Fry doughnuts, 3 or 4 at a time, until golden brown, adjusting heat to maintain temperature, about 1 minute per side. Using a slotted spoon, transfer doughnuts to paper towels to drain, Cool completely.

Add doughnuts and doughnut holes to bowl of spiced sugar and toss to coat. Serve immediately.

Conversions & Equivalents

Volume | Baking | Metric | Pan Size | Temperature | Oven | Other

1/2 teaspoon = 30 drops
1 teaspoon = 1/3 tablespoon OR 60 drops
3 teaspoon = 1 tablespoon or 1/2 fluid ounce
1/2 tablespoon = 1 1/2 teaspoons
1 tablespoon = 3 teaspoons or 1/2 fluid ounce
2 tablespoons = 1/8 cup or 1 fluid ounce
3 tablespoons = 1 1/2 fluid ounces
4 tablespoons = 1 1/4 cup or 2 fluid ounces
5 1/3 tablespoons = 1/3 cup or 5 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon
8 tablespoons = 1/2 cup or 4 fluid ounces
10 2/3 tablespoons = 2/3 cup or 10 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons
12 tablespoons = 3/4 cup or 6 fluid ounces
16 tablespoons = 1 cup or 8 fluid ounces or 1/2 pint
1/8 cup = 2 tablespoons or 1 fluid ounce
1/4 cup = 4 tablespoons or 2 fluid ounces
1/3 cup = 5 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon
3/8 cup = 1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons
1/2 cup = 8 tablespoons or 4 fluid ounces
2/3 cup = 10 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons
5/8 cup = 1/2 cup + 2 teaspoons
3/4 cup = 12 tablespoons or 6 fluid ounces
7/8 cup = 3/4 cup + 2 tablespoons
1 cup = 16 tablespoons or 1/2 pint or 8 fluid ounces
2 cups = 1 pint or 16 fluid ounces
1 pint = 2 cups or 16 fluid ounces
1 quart = 2 pints or 4 cups or 32 fluid ounces
1 gallon = 4 quarts or 8 pints or 16 cups or 128 fluid ounces
FLOUR
1 cup all-purpose flour = 5 ounces or 142 grams
1 cup cake flour = 4 ounces or 113 grams
1 cup whole wheat flour = 5 1/2 ounces or 156 grams
SUGAR
1 cup granulated white sugar = 7 ounces or 198 grams
1 cup packed brown sugar = 7 ounces or 198 grams
1 cup confectioners sugar = 4 ounces or 113 grams
COCOA POWDER
1 cup cocoa powder = 3 ounces or 85 grams
BUTTER
4 tablespoons = 1/2 stick or 1/4 cup or 2 ounces
8 tablespoons = 1 stick or 1/2 cup or 4 ounces
16 tablespoons = 2 sticks or 1 cup or 8 ounces
32 tablespoons = 4 sticks or 2 cups or 1 pound
1/4 teaspoon = 1.23 milliliters
1/2 teaspoon = 2.46 milliliters
3/4 teaspoon = 3.7 milliliters
1 teaspoon = 4.93 milliliters
1 1/4 teaspoon = 6.16 milliliters
1 1/2 teaspoon = 7.39 milliliters
1 3/4 teaspoon = 8.63 milliliters
2 teaspoon = 9.86 milliliters
1 tablespoon = 14.79 milliliters
2 tablespoons = 29.57 milliliters
1/4 cup = 59.15 milliliters
1/2 cup = 118.3 milliliters
1 cup = 236.59 milliliters
2 cups or 1 pint = 473.18 milliliters
3 cups = 709.77 milliliters
4 cups or 1 quart = 946.36 milliliters
1/4 teaspoon = 1.23 milliliters
4 quarts or 1 gallon = 3.785 liters
PAN SIZE VOLUME CAN SUBSTITUTE WITH
1 8-inch round cake pan 4 cups

1 8x4-inch loaf pan

1 9-inch round cake pan

1 9-inch pie plate

2 8-inch round cake pans 8 cups

2 8x4-inch loaf pans

1 9-inch tube pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

1 11x7-inch baking dish

1 10-inch springform pan

1 9-inch round cake pan 6 cups

1 8-inch round cake pan

1 8x4-inch loaf pan

1 11x7-inch baking dish

2 9-inch round cake pans 12 cups

2 8x4-inch loaf pans

1 9-inch tube pan

2 8-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 11x7-inch baking dish

1 10-inch springform pan

1 10-inch round cake pan 11 cups

2 8-inch round cake pan

1 9-inch tube pan

1 10-inch springform pan

2 10-inch round cake pans 22 cups

5 8-inch round cake pans

3 or 4 9-inch round cake pans

2 10-inch spring form pan

9-inch tube pan 12 cups

2 8-inch round cake pans

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

10-inch tube pans 16 cups

3 9-inch round cake pans

2 10-inch pie plates

4 8-inch pie plates

2 9x5-inch loaf pans

2 8-inch square baking dishes

2 9-inch square baking dishes

10-inch bundt pan 12 cups

1 9x13-inch baking dish

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 9-inch tube pan

2 11x7-inch baking dishes

1 10-inch springform pan

11x7x2-inch baking dish 6 cups

1 8-inch square baking dish

1 9-inch square baking dish

1 9-inch round cake pan

9x13x2-inch baking dish 15 cups

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

3 8-inch round cake pans

1 10x15-inch jellyroll pan

10x15x1-inch jellyroll pan 15 cups

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

2 8-inch round cake pan

1 9x13-inch baking dish

9x5-inch loaf pan 8 cups

1 10-inch pie plate pan

1 8-inch square baking dish

1 9-inch square baking dish

8x4-inch loaf pan 6 cups

1 8-inch round cake pan

1 11x7-inch baking dish

9-inch springform pan 10 cups

1 10-inch round cake pan

1 10-inch spring form pan

2 8-inch round cake pans

2 9-inch round cake pans

10-inch springform pan 12 cups

2 8x4-inch loaf pan

1 9-inch tube pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 11x7-inch baking dishes

2 8-inch round cake pans

8-inch square baking dish 8 cups

1 9x5-inch loaf pan

2 8-inch pie plates

9-inch square baking dish 8 cups

1 11x7-inch baking dish

1 9x5-inch loaf pan

2 8-inch pie plate

Water Freezes 32°F 0°C
  40°F 4.4°C
  50°F 10°C
  60°F 15.6°C
  70°F 21.1°C
  80°F 26.7°C
  90°F 32.2°C
  100°F 37.8°C
  110°F 43.3°C
  120°F 48.9°C
  130°F 54.4°C
  140°F 60°C
  150°F 65.6°C
  160°F 71.1°C
  170°F 76.7°C
  180°F 82.2°C
  190°F 87.8°C
  200°F 93.3°C
Water Boils 212°F 100°C
  250°F 121°C
  300°F 149°C
  350°F 177°C
  400°F 205°C
  450°F 233°C
  500°F 260°C
275°F = 140°C or Gas Mark 1
300°F = 150°C or Gas Mark 2
325°F = 165°C or Gas Mark 3
350°F = 180°C or Gas Mark 4
375°F = 190°C or Gas Mark 5
400°F = 200°C or Gas Mark 6
425°F = 220°C or Gas Mark 7
450°F = 230°C or Gas Mark 9
475°F = 240°C or Gas Mark 10

And for conversions that are not listed I found a great conversion calculator here!

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  1. ZOMG! Dude…these look soooo yumma yumma!! I’m going to HAVE to try these!!!!!

    And btw, was your choco peanut butter cake the one that looked all pretty with the ganache looking topping that looked picture perfect? I loved that!

  2. Donna – yes that is the one. I have been bombarded with requests for it, which means I need to find an excuse to make it here soon.

  3. I agree. These donuts were amazing. I think 6 of us almost finished the entire batch Sunday night. Thank you for bringing a treat for us to share. No pressure or anything for our next time together…..

  4. Hey, the cinnamon rolls were great but these look super yummy as well! Wish I could grab one out of the screen! My experience with deep frying is… well, it never ends well when I try it, no matter how diligently I check the temperature of the oil. Oh well, I will simply drool over your pictures :)

  5. Wow, Meg, you seriously take some amazing photos! Are you a photographer? Everything is so perfect looking, and delicious. I’d almost feel bad eating these donuts :)…. almost.

  6. Beautiful photos, these look super delicious!
    Congrats on the top 9! :)

  7. So much better than Krispy Kreme… Nice recipe, I love the buttermilk in it. Congo-rats on top 9!

    Matt Kay

  8. I am craving pumpkin, and have been thinking of making my first doughnuts. Wow, these look fantastic. Fattening, but once in a while, who cares?

  9. OMG – I want these so bad. This will have to be a repeat. Maybe for a Christmas trip?

 

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