pork and chive pot stickers

April 11, 2011 | 33 comments

pork and chive potstickers

Take out boxes are not very common in our house. Usually the the food inside is always swimming in a sloppy sauce requiring far more rice than any normal human can handle in one sitting and I find it excruciatingly frustrating that I am chopstick challenged. My husband seems to pinch, squeeze and release inside mouth with carefree ease, but I cannot. What? Hold two sticks and pick something up with them at the same time and move it to my mouth? Oh yes, there have been many lessons and laughs at my expense, but that is why I consider the ancient Greek people (and everyone who has followed) some of the smartest people in the world. Forks. They ate with forks, not sticks, not fingers, but forks. But I won’t bore you with a mini rant on my preference (since I seem to be the only one who thinks this way) of hard, washable, sanitary, reusable forks over these straight wooden sticks that what? Just one use? What? Possible splinters in hand or food (and ultimately digestive tract if unnoticed before devouring) if your pair happen to be really cheap (because this would happen to me)? What? Lack of dexterity and the ability to hold these sticks at the proper angle with the correct fingers to pick something up, and when you finally do, it happens to drop in your white short-ed lap before reaching your mouth because, seriously people, who thought it would be a good idea to eat with sticks….but like I said, I won’t mention it, for your sakes, of course.

ingredientsthe soy

That is why these here pages are dedicated to easy, fork stab-able and maneuverable recipes that you don’t have to patiently wait for your fingers to finally get the clue as to pinching and tweezing and awkwardly picking up and putting in your famished belly at the same time. Forks, will always be welcome, chopsticks, will be welcome when I am sick and in bed and can’t manage to move a muscle to make a decent meal for my better half who still needs to eat.

filling uppinching

But on occasions that his said wife feels like being extra nice and loving and doting and everything good wives are suppose to be, she makes him Chinese that does not involve a white cardboard box, tips to the delivery guy, or heavy foods that require five pounds of rice to soak up all that sauce. She makes him cute little dumplings that are dipped in a much more flavorful soy ginger sauce than your local Panda West can offer. (And secretly eats them in a corner with a fork.)

dunking

One Year Ago: Mustard Roasted Tilapia

Pork and Chive Pot Stickers
Barely adapted from Everyday Food, October 2009

Makes about a dozen

1/4 pound ground pork
1 tablespoon minced chives
1 1/2 teaspoons soy sauce
1 1/2 teaspoons dry white wine
1 teaspoons minced peeled ginger
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
Pot sticker or Wonton wrapers
1 tablespoon vegetable oil

In a bowl, combine, pork, chives, soy sauce, wine, ginger, and sesame oil.

Place a heaping teaspoon of pork mixture in center of pot sticker wrapper. Lightly wetting the edges of the wrapper, fold over and press to seal. Repeat until all the filling has been used.

Boil a large pot of water and add 1 tablespoon of oil. In two batches cook dumplings until cooked through and rise to the top, about 4 – 6 minutes. Transfer to a plate with a slotted spoon. In a large nonstick skillet (I learned the hard way), heat vegetable oil over medium high heat. In two batches cook until browned, about 1 1/2 minutes per side. Serve with Soy-ginger sauce.

Soy Ginger Sauce

In a bowl, stir together 2 tablespoons soy sauce, 1 1/2 tablespoons rice vinegar, 1 tablespoon minced peeled ginger, 1 teaspoon sugar, and 1/4 teaspoon sesame oil. Garnish with minced chives.

To Freeze: Freeze raw dumplings on a baking sheet until hard, then shore in bags for up to 3 months. When ready to make place frozen dumplings directly into boiling water (do not thaw).

Conversions & Equivalents

Volume | Baking | Metric | Pan Size | Temperature | Oven | Other

1/2 teaspoon = 30 drops
1 teaspoon = 1/3 tablespoon OR 60 drops
3 teaspoon = 1 tablespoon or 1/2 fluid ounce
1/2 tablespoon = 1 1/2 teaspoons
1 tablespoon = 3 teaspoons or 1/2 fluid ounce
2 tablespoons = 1/8 cup or 1 fluid ounce
3 tablespoons = 1 1/2 fluid ounces
4 tablespoons = 1 1/4 cup or 2 fluid ounces
5 1/3 tablespoons = 1/3 cup or 5 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon
8 tablespoons = 1/2 cup or 4 fluid ounces
10 2/3 tablespoons = 2/3 cup or 10 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons
12 tablespoons = 3/4 cup or 6 fluid ounces
16 tablespoons = 1 cup or 8 fluid ounces or 1/2 pint
1/8 cup = 2 tablespoons or 1 fluid ounce
1/4 cup = 4 tablespoons or 2 fluid ounces
1/3 cup = 5 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon
3/8 cup = 1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons
1/2 cup = 8 tablespoons or 4 fluid ounces
2/3 cup = 10 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons
5/8 cup = 1/2 cup + 2 teaspoons
3/4 cup = 12 tablespoons or 6 fluid ounces
7/8 cup = 3/4 cup + 2 tablespoons
1 cup = 16 tablespoons or 1/2 pint or 8 fluid ounces
2 cups = 1 pint or 16 fluid ounces
1 pint = 2 cups or 16 fluid ounces
1 quart = 2 pints or 4 cups or 32 fluid ounces
1 gallon = 4 quarts or 8 pints or 16 cups or 128 fluid ounces
FLOUR
1 cup all-purpose flour = 5 ounces or 142 grams
1 cup cake flour = 4 ounces or 113 grams
1 cup whole wheat flour = 5 1/2 ounces or 156 grams
SUGAR
1 cup granulated white sugar = 7 ounces or 198 grams
1 cup packed brown sugar = 7 ounces or 198 grams
1 cup confectioners sugar = 4 ounces or 113 grams
COCOA POWDER
1 cup cocoa powder = 3 ounces or 85 grams
BUTTER
4 tablespoons = 1/2 stick or 1/4 cup or 2 ounces
8 tablespoons = 1 stick or 1/2 cup or 4 ounces
16 tablespoons = 2 sticks or 1 cup or 8 ounces
32 tablespoons = 4 sticks or 2 cups or 1 pound
1/4 teaspoon = 1.23 milliliters
1/2 teaspoon = 2.46 milliliters
3/4 teaspoon = 3.7 milliliters
1 teaspoon = 4.93 milliliters
1 1/4 teaspoon = 6.16 milliliters
1 1/2 teaspoon = 7.39 milliliters
1 3/4 teaspoon = 8.63 milliliters
2 teaspoon = 9.86 milliliters
1 tablespoon = 14.79 milliliters
2 tablespoons = 29.57 milliliters
1/4 cup = 59.15 milliliters
1/2 cup = 118.3 milliliters
1 cup = 236.59 milliliters
2 cups or 1 pint = 473.18 milliliters
3 cups = 709.77 milliliters
4 cups or 1 quart = 946.36 milliliters
1/4 teaspoon = 1.23 milliliters
4 quarts or 1 gallon = 3.785 liters
PAN SIZE VOLUME CAN SUBSTITUTE WITH
1 8-inch round cake pan 4 cups

1 8x4-inch loaf pan

1 9-inch round cake pan

1 9-inch pie plate

2 8-inch round cake pans 8 cups

2 8x4-inch loaf pans

1 9-inch tube pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

1 11x7-inch baking dish

1 10-inch springform pan

1 9-inch round cake pan 6 cups

1 8-inch round cake pan

1 8x4-inch loaf pan

1 11x7-inch baking dish

2 9-inch round cake pans 12 cups

2 8x4-inch loaf pans

1 9-inch tube pan

2 8-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 11x7-inch baking dish

1 10-inch springform pan

1 10-inch round cake pan 11 cups

2 8-inch round cake pan

1 9-inch tube pan

1 10-inch springform pan

2 10-inch round cake pans 22 cups

5 8-inch round cake pans

3 or 4 9-inch round cake pans

2 10-inch spring form pan

9-inch tube pan 12 cups

2 8-inch round cake pans

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

10-inch tube pans 16 cups

3 9-inch round cake pans

2 10-inch pie plates

4 8-inch pie plates

2 9x5-inch loaf pans

2 8-inch square baking dishes

2 9-inch square baking dishes

10-inch bundt pan 12 cups

1 9x13-inch baking dish

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 9-inch tube pan

2 11x7-inch baking dishes

1 10-inch springform pan

11x7x2-inch baking dish 6 cups

1 8-inch square baking dish

1 9-inch square baking dish

1 9-inch round cake pan

9x13x2-inch baking dish 15 cups

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

3 8-inch round cake pans

1 10x15-inch jellyroll pan

10x15x1-inch jellyroll pan 15 cups

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

2 8-inch round cake pan

1 9x13-inch baking dish

9x5-inch loaf pan 8 cups

1 10-inch pie plate pan

1 8-inch square baking dish

1 9-inch square baking dish

8x4-inch loaf pan 6 cups

1 8-inch round cake pan

1 11x7-inch baking dish

9-inch springform pan 10 cups

1 10-inch round cake pan

1 10-inch spring form pan

2 8-inch round cake pans

2 9-inch round cake pans

10-inch springform pan 12 cups

2 8x4-inch loaf pan

1 9-inch tube pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 11x7-inch baking dishes

2 8-inch round cake pans

8-inch square baking dish 8 cups

1 9x5-inch loaf pan

2 8-inch pie plates

9-inch square baking dish 8 cups

1 11x7-inch baking dish

1 9x5-inch loaf pan

2 8-inch pie plate

Water Freezes 32°F 0°C
  40°F 4.4°C
  50°F 10°C
  60°F 15.6°C
  70°F 21.1°C
  80°F 26.7°C
  90°F 32.2°C
  100°F 37.8°C
  110°F 43.3°C
  120°F 48.9°C
  130°F 54.4°C
  140°F 60°C
  150°F 65.6°C
  160°F 71.1°C
  170°F 76.7°C
  180°F 82.2°C
  190°F 87.8°C
  200°F 93.3°C
Water Boils 212°F 100°C
  250°F 121°C
  300°F 149°C
  350°F 177°C
  400°F 205°C
  450°F 233°C
  500°F 260°C
275°F = 140°C or Gas Mark 1
300°F = 150°C or Gas Mark 2
325°F = 165°C or Gas Mark 3
350°F = 180°C or Gas Mark 4
375°F = 190°C or Gas Mark 5
400°F = 200°C or Gas Mark 6
425°F = 220°C or Gas Mark 7
450°F = 230°C or Gas Mark 9
475°F = 240°C or Gas Mark 10

And for conversions that are not listed I found a great conversion calculator here!

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  1. I’m really going to have to make these! I love potstickers but I have never had homemade. Yummy=)

  2. Mmm! Looks delicious! I will have to try this, I have never attempted to make these at home, yet it seems quite easy. Thanks for the great recipe.

  3. Can never go wrong with pot stickers, I much prefer making mine at home too. Yours came out really nice.
    -Gina-

  4. This is like care-team fodder for sure. PS. I like pot-stickers toooooo.

    And I was listening to the radio the other day, and the hosts were talking about a recipe they saw for AMAZING cookie dough stuffed cupcakes. I felt ahead of the curve!

  5. Yum! These look delicious! Do you think these would freeze well? Last time I made pot stickers I froze half for later and cooked the other half that day. Loved having more to look forward to later on.

  6. These look wonderful. Thanks for friending us on Tasty Kitchen.

  7. These look so yummy and easy! Can’t wait to try these!

  8. I just had pot stickers at Dim Sum this weekend, and wondered to myself why I could not make such delicious ones at home (or so I assumed). I think you post has inspired me to do so now!

  9. I LOVE pot stickers. This looks absolutely delicious!!

  10. Meg your pot stickers looks awesome! Got me inspired to make some myself =) Thanks!

  11. WOw! I love the look of these pot stickers! Yummy!

  12. Potstickers might be my favorite part of Asian cuisine and yours look amazing! (and for dumplings also look relatively simple which makes me happy) Thanks for sharing!

  13. This look amazing! I love pork potstickers but have been slightly intimidated about making them at home. I’m definitely trying this!! Thanks!

  14. These are perfect looking pot stickers. They are making my mouth water. Congrats on the Foodbuzz top 9 today!

  15. Looks great. I made a very similar one with ginger too.

  16. These are gorgeous and making me very hungry. I’ve done homemade potstickers
    as an interactive project at a party. Made the filling ahead and had the guest (of all ages)
    stuff and pinch and/or pleat. They came out great and everyone had a lot of fun.

  17. These look wonderful. I adore potstickers and like your addition of chive.

  18. my all time fav .. ALL TIME. Can eat these non stop :) Congrats on top 9 !

  19. LOVE homemade potstickers. Don’t love the time& effort to make them but they are worth it. Yours look scrumptious enough to inspire me to take on thiscommitment again

  20. Tracy — yes, the are definitely freezer friendly. I’ve updated the recipe to include freezing directions.
    Tammy — these are actually incredible quick, mixing the filling in a bowl, wrapping and pinching the filling then a quick cook and you’re done. You can even make a large batch and freeze them for later if you don’t have a spare 30 minutes one night.

  21. My family would really love it if I learned how to make these. Your photo of the pot stickers is yum yum yummy looking!

  22. I don’t make enough Asian dishes. Somehow, it feels so “foreign” to me, that I don’t know where to jump in. Thank you for such a beautiful pictorial demo on how to make these. I think I can do this, and I can already tell I’d love them.

  23. I love pot stickers. I just need to learn to cook them right so that I don’t burn one side. Your photo made these look so great. I need to plan a chinese night in the near future so that I can love these in my tummy instead of on the computer.

  24. I too am chop stick challenged. I just can’t do it. And they all make it look so easy! How dare them. Your pot stickers look delish!

  25. Your pot stickers look so delicious and you seal them so well! I usually serve them with black vinegar and shredded ginger instead of soya sauce.

  26. Oh goodness. These look wonderful! Bookmark.

  27. Thank you for the cute story and delicious looking pot stickers. Our family loves gyoza very much and I have quite a few recipes and I posted one in the past. I’m delighted to add yours in the pile.

  28. That look so delicious and that pics very wonderful.

    fardia

  29. Aloha, this looks so delicious!

  30. These look soooo yummy! You got a great char on the pot stickers. A really great simple way to make pot stickers. And I am with you on chopsticks! I am Chinese and grew up with them and still can’t use them!

  31. I think chopsticks is something you have to learn as a kid. Not that adults can’t learn, just that it gets a whole lot harder. My family loved dim sum and Chinese food and went often while I was growing up, so I learned to use chopsticks almost at the same time as I was learning to use a fork. It’s just second nature now.

    I made these for lunch yesterday – or a version of them, anyways. I’ve given up measuring ingredients when I’m not baking (I know some people don’t measure while baking, but that causes catastrophes in my kitchen) so I just kind of tossed everything together and hoped for the best.

    My husband liked them but his stomach didn’t (he didn’t grow up with many spices or ethnic foods), my son (20 mos.) seemed confused by them and I thought they should have been spicier… so when I make them again, it’ll probably just be for my lunches, and I’ll experiment with some more spiciness.

  32. Is it safe to refreeze the uncooked pot stickers if the pork you used was frozen once already…i heard you cannot refreeze meat??

  33. Carolyn — yes, it is safe. According to the USDA, “once food had been thawed in the refrigerator it is safe to refreeze without cooking it.”
    Here is the link to read more: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/factsheets/focus_on_freezing/index.asp#14

 

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