meg’s favorite orange cake

August 10, 2011 | 16 comments

meg's favorite orange cake

Or, Meg’s favorite birthday cake ever. Yes, I turned 23 last week and determined to make myself a birthday cake after panicking that 1) this will be the last year I will have spare time to do so 2) I have energy to do so, err an entire week after the fact 3) wanted something different than the overkill of chocolate peanut butter cake we consume the same week and 4) the past three times I’ve made this in the last month weren’t enough, I needed more.

orange juiceshells

Usually I brush over my birthday letting someone else worry about the ins and outs of a birthday cake for someone who can be hard to please (sorry!) and have for the last three years settled with the fact that I will eat my husband’s cake as he has the audacity to have a birthday six days after mine (albeit 2 years before me). Instead I was satisfied with my sudden and fierce craving for beef lo mein (even I am blaming this one on pregnancy since, whoa, I am avid and determined to purpose-my-life-around-spreading-hatred for Chinese food. Like where did this blasphemy that tastes like the best thing I ever ate come from?).

cream cheesy frostingmore swooshing

And then there was a day of regret. I love cake. I love everything about cake. I love decorating cake. And now, I will be consumed with making a first birthday cake, and a second birthday cake, and then a first birthday cake and a third birthday cake and where will the cake be for mama?! Mama doesn’t want a monkey shaped banana frosted cake, she doesn’t want a strawberry lady bug cake, she wants something grown up, something to please her (ahem, childish) palette — where have the year’s gone?! Why did I waste them thinking his birthday cake would be good enough for me! Seriously, I had a fleshy moment, and then I indulged with my very own cake, because like I said, the last three times in the last thirty days I’ve eaten this cake were enough to make me want it again.

orange peel curls

The recipe came from my kindergarten teacher, who will hopefully be my kid’s kindergarten teacher if I was actually planning on letting them grow up (which I’m not) and is surprisingly a Paula Deen recipe. I say surprisingly because when I see the name Paula Deen I read: butter overkill, heart attack before you take your first bite, must restock your fridge and pantry because she will use all your Costco sized stock of butter, crisco (which actually I do need to get rid of — why do I have this stuff again?), sugar, flour, and add an insane amounts of rolls to your already growing too fast waist. But I put down my banner since I ate about three slices before finding out that Paula was behind it all, and really I don’t have a bad thing to say about her. We are best friends now, because she has given me this insanely ridiculous tangy sweet cake that I could eat every year for my birthday and all the days in between.

fresh orange cakemy slice

One Year Ago: Romain and Egg Stuffed Tomatoes and Arugula Goat Cheese Ravioli

Fresh Orange Cake
Adapted from Paula Deen

So, I am a big fan of cream cheese frosting, yet usually none of them are tangy enough for me. I always find the sugar way too high and over taking the cream cheesy-ness. If you prefer your frosting sweeter you can add more sugar; Paula’s recipe called for 8-cups which gave me three cavities after just reading. With more sugar the frosting will be thicker more like buttercream whereas this is a bit thinner.

Cake:
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 3/4 cups sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup vegetable oil
1 cup fresh orange juice
3 large eggs
1 cup sour cream

Frosting:
1 stick butter, softened
3 8-ounce packages cream cheese, softened
1/4 cup fresh orange juice
2 cups confectioners sugar

Cake: Preheat oven to 350-degrees. Spray 3 9-inch cake pans with nonstick baking spray and line with parchment. Spray parchment with baking spray.

In a large bowl sift together flour, sugar, baking soda, baking powder, and salt. Add oil, orange juice, eggs and sour cream. Beat at medium speed with a mixer until smooth. Pour into prepared pans and bake for 20 – 25 minutes or until wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Let cool in pans for 10 minutes. Remove from pans and cool completely on wire racks.

Frosting: In a large bowl, beat butter and cream cheese at medium speed with a mixer until creamy. Add orange juice, beating until combined. Gradually add confectioners sugar beating until smooth.

Assembly: Spread frosting evenly between layers and on top and sides of cake. Garnish with orange rind curls, if desired.

Conversions & Equivalents

Volume | Baking | Metric | Pan Size | Temperature | Oven | Other

1/2 teaspoon = 30 drops
1 teaspoon = 1/3 tablespoon OR 60 drops
3 teaspoon = 1 tablespoon or 1/2 fluid ounce
1/2 tablespoon = 1 1/2 teaspoons
1 tablespoon = 3 teaspoons or 1/2 fluid ounce
2 tablespoons = 1/8 cup or 1 fluid ounce
3 tablespoons = 1 1/2 fluid ounces
4 tablespoons = 1 1/4 cup or 2 fluid ounces
5 1/3 tablespoons = 1/3 cup or 5 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon
8 tablespoons = 1/2 cup or 4 fluid ounces
10 2/3 tablespoons = 2/3 cup or 10 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons
12 tablespoons = 3/4 cup or 6 fluid ounces
16 tablespoons = 1 cup or 8 fluid ounces or 1/2 pint
1/8 cup = 2 tablespoons or 1 fluid ounce
1/4 cup = 4 tablespoons or 2 fluid ounces
1/3 cup = 5 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon
3/8 cup = 1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons
1/2 cup = 8 tablespoons or 4 fluid ounces
2/3 cup = 10 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons
5/8 cup = 1/2 cup + 2 teaspoons
3/4 cup = 12 tablespoons or 6 fluid ounces
7/8 cup = 3/4 cup + 2 tablespoons
1 cup = 16 tablespoons or 1/2 pint or 8 fluid ounces
2 cups = 1 pint or 16 fluid ounces
1 pint = 2 cups or 16 fluid ounces
1 quart = 2 pints or 4 cups or 32 fluid ounces
1 gallon = 4 quarts or 8 pints or 16 cups or 128 fluid ounces
FLOUR
1 cup all-purpose flour = 5 ounces or 142 grams
1 cup cake flour = 4 ounces or 113 grams
1 cup whole wheat flour = 5 1/2 ounces or 156 grams
SUGAR
1 cup granulated white sugar = 7 ounces or 198 grams
1 cup packed brown sugar = 7 ounces or 198 grams
1 cup confectioners sugar = 4 ounces or 113 grams
COCOA POWDER
1 cup cocoa powder = 3 ounces or 85 grams
BUTTER
4 tablespoons = 1/2 stick or 1/4 cup or 2 ounces
8 tablespoons = 1 stick or 1/2 cup or 4 ounces
16 tablespoons = 2 sticks or 1 cup or 8 ounces
32 tablespoons = 4 sticks or 2 cups or 1 pound
1/4 teaspoon = 1.23 milliliters
1/2 teaspoon = 2.46 milliliters
3/4 teaspoon = 3.7 milliliters
1 teaspoon = 4.93 milliliters
1 1/4 teaspoon = 6.16 milliliters
1 1/2 teaspoon = 7.39 milliliters
1 3/4 teaspoon = 8.63 milliliters
2 teaspoon = 9.86 milliliters
1 tablespoon = 14.79 milliliters
2 tablespoons = 29.57 milliliters
1/4 cup = 59.15 milliliters
1/2 cup = 118.3 milliliters
1 cup = 236.59 milliliters
2 cups or 1 pint = 473.18 milliliters
3 cups = 709.77 milliliters
4 cups or 1 quart = 946.36 milliliters
1/4 teaspoon = 1.23 milliliters
4 quarts or 1 gallon = 3.785 liters
PAN SIZE VOLUME CAN SUBSTITUTE WITH
1 8-inch round cake pan 4 cups

1 8x4-inch loaf pan

1 9-inch round cake pan

1 9-inch pie plate

2 8-inch round cake pans 8 cups

2 8x4-inch loaf pans

1 9-inch tube pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

1 11x7-inch baking dish

1 10-inch springform pan

1 9-inch round cake pan 6 cups

1 8-inch round cake pan

1 8x4-inch loaf pan

1 11x7-inch baking dish

2 9-inch round cake pans 12 cups

2 8x4-inch loaf pans

1 9-inch tube pan

2 8-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 11x7-inch baking dish

1 10-inch springform pan

1 10-inch round cake pan 11 cups

2 8-inch round cake pan

1 9-inch tube pan

1 10-inch springform pan

2 10-inch round cake pans 22 cups

5 8-inch round cake pans

3 or 4 9-inch round cake pans

2 10-inch spring form pan

9-inch tube pan 12 cups

2 8-inch round cake pans

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

10-inch tube pans 16 cups

3 9-inch round cake pans

2 10-inch pie plates

4 8-inch pie plates

2 9x5-inch loaf pans

2 8-inch square baking dishes

2 9-inch square baking dishes

10-inch bundt pan 12 cups

1 9x13-inch baking dish

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 9-inch tube pan

2 11x7-inch baking dishes

1 10-inch springform pan

11x7x2-inch baking dish 6 cups

1 8-inch square baking dish

1 9-inch square baking dish

1 9-inch round cake pan

9x13x2-inch baking dish 15 cups

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

3 8-inch round cake pans

1 10x15-inch jellyroll pan

10x15x1-inch jellyroll pan 15 cups

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

2 8-inch round cake pan

1 9x13-inch baking dish

9x5-inch loaf pan 8 cups

1 10-inch pie plate pan

1 8-inch square baking dish

1 9-inch square baking dish

8x4-inch loaf pan 6 cups

1 8-inch round cake pan

1 11x7-inch baking dish

9-inch springform pan 10 cups

1 10-inch round cake pan

1 10-inch spring form pan

2 8-inch round cake pans

2 9-inch round cake pans

10-inch springform pan 12 cups

2 8x4-inch loaf pan

1 9-inch tube pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 11x7-inch baking dishes

2 8-inch round cake pans

8-inch square baking dish 8 cups

1 9x5-inch loaf pan

2 8-inch pie plates

9-inch square baking dish 8 cups

1 11x7-inch baking dish

1 9x5-inch loaf pan

2 8-inch pie plate

Water Freezes 32°F 0°C
  40°F 4.4°C
  50°F 10°C
  60°F 15.6°C
  70°F 21.1°C
  80°F 26.7°C
  90°F 32.2°C
  100°F 37.8°C
  110°F 43.3°C
  120°F 48.9°C
  130°F 54.4°C
  140°F 60°C
  150°F 65.6°C
  160°F 71.1°C
  170°F 76.7°C
  180°F 82.2°C
  190°F 87.8°C
  200°F 93.3°C
Water Boils 212°F 100°C
  250°F 121°C
  300°F 149°C
  350°F 177°C
  400°F 205°C
  450°F 233°C
  500°F 260°C
275°F = 140°C or Gas Mark 1
300°F = 150°C or Gas Mark 2
325°F = 165°C or Gas Mark 3
350°F = 180°C or Gas Mark 4
375°F = 190°C or Gas Mark 5
400°F = 200°C or Gas Mark 6
425°F = 220°C or Gas Mark 7
450°F = 230°C or Gas Mark 9
475°F = 240°C or Gas Mark 10

And for conversions that are not listed I found a great conversion calculator here!

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  1. I love orange cake! As much as I love peanut butter and chocolate, even I need a break from it and crave something light and tangy not just sweet overkill. This cake is awesome and I think I need to make one for myself now! (Yes, all by myself!)

  2. Connie Tindell  Wednesday August 10, 2011

    Absolutely Beautiful! Wish I was there to have some! This is also my favorite cake!

  3. This cake looks so gorgeous! I’ve been having major cake cravings lately, but felt so burned out on the regular vanilla and chocolate options. Orange cake sounds so refreshing and so yummy!

    Oh, and Happy Birthday!! Hope it was a great one!

  4. What a beautiful cake. I bet it tastes fantastic. Wonderful picture.

  5. This cake sounds delicious and I know I will be making it sometime soon. I put orange cream cheese frosting on carrot cake (if I’m not using pecans) and just add zest to my regular cream cheese icing. It adds that wonderful orange flavor and specks of color.

  6. Good choice! Love this cake!! :-D

  7. The orange peel “curls” are adorable as a cake topper/garnish. Glad you celebrated with a cake YOU enjoy! (I make my own birthday cakes, too.) :)

  8. I hear you on the birthday cake. I made my own (July 20th)and I loved it… so did the rest of my guests. I love to bake cakes, more than cupcakes, because they seem so special. I can assure you that after reading the ingredient’s list I am making this cake. I just need an excuse, so that I am not left alone to eat this one. It’s a beautiful cake, piled high! The garnish is gorgeous.

  9. I’m glad you took matters into your own hands. Looks like you did pretty well for yourself! Beautiful cake.

  10. OMGosh … happy birthday to you … your cake rocks; i want some, however, not *enough* to ruin the salad, fruit, leeeaaan meat, etc … but i love looking at it!!!

    ps … your pics rock, always … they my keyboard slimy with drool … LOL

  11. Looks amazing and am getting ready to try this!! Being the novice that I am though, is the flour measurement 2 1/2 cups of flour? I’m assuming it is….:) I’ll give it a go!

  12. Shelly — yes it is. Thanks for catching the typo, I’ve corrected the recipe to reflect the change.

  13. I wasn’t positive, but figured it was…our cake turned out fantastic!!! Thank you! Looking forward to trying more of your recipes and reading your highly entertaining blog!

  14. How great that you made an orange birthday cake. And with no chocolate! Love the idea

  15. I made this for my son’s first birthday (orange themed) and it was delicious! Everyone couldn’t get enough of it! I used coconut oil in place of vegetable oil (always a substitute in my cake recipes! It makes it soooo moist and flavorful), added some vanilla extract, and orange rinds to the batter. Also, I used Paula Deen’s recipe for cream cheese and orange frosting. Thank you for a great birthday cake!!!

 

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