mushroom and lentil pot pie

November 10, 2011 | 3 comments

mushroom and lentil pot pie

I’m sure by now you readers are tired of me talking about naps, lack of energy and meal-less weeks because I’ve been, well, exhausted, but I’m afraid if I don’t make my constant excuse I would only have one thing left to talk about: my husband reenacting the five minute squirrel sequence he saw out his office window the other day — proving that we are clearly not ready to be parents or even interact with this superior race of humans. Despite these word lacking charade-esque conversations, I have had a sudden attack of revitalized energy, which is probably what a normal person feels like, except I’ve been without it for so long the tiniest morsel has sent me off the edge as I have begun scrubbing and reorganizing every nook and cranny of our living space in a feverish attempt to get things clean and pristine before welcoming a little bundle that will look a little too much like us (sorry kid).

lentilsbulky mix
mushrooms part 1mushrooms part 2

Again, probably not the story you want to hear, but it does at least mean we got a hot meal that I now get to discuss. So pot pie, it is perhaps one of my more favorite dinners except this husband of mine had, once upon a time, long, long ago, a pot pie shell that was underbaked and raw and was “apparently forced” to choke this horrible thing down. Which basically meant he had me sign a prenup stating I would never make a pot pie for as long as we live and thus we started our marriage blissful, happy and pot pie-less. Thing is, I believe in the power of genetics. My dad, he is a cereal man. No, I mean, he is like made of cereal. I’ve heard legends of 10-bowl cereals sessions, Grand Canyon sized mixing bowls full of milk covered flakes for his immediate after dinner top off — and well, I sort of inherited this genetic malfunction. I really should think about buying stock in General Mills, but, this is not about cereal. It is about pot pie. My dad also has an addiction to puff pastry topped stews and, well, it has passed on to me as I seem to be addicted as well, only letting myself fall into the temptation of eating one while at a restaurant because of this stupid prenup I had to sign.

sealed and vented

But a nine month pregnant woman pretty much gets a pass on everything, like taking up the entire bed because it is the only way to get comfortable, or drinking a gallon of egg nog because it is the only way to cope with a belly that has been stretched beyond what you thought was humanly possible, and making pot pies despite this ill-made agreement. So I made them, we ate them, and guess what. The prenup was torn up as his bowl was returned to the sink without a single lentil left behind. Moral of the story: my kid will like cereal, egg nog and pot pie.

mushroom and lentil pot pie

One Year Ago: Roasted Sweet Potato and Black Bean Salad, Salami and Scallion Biscuits

Mushroom and Lentil Pot Pie with Gouda Biscuit Crust
Adapted from Bon Appetit

Serves 4

Notes: Perhaps my pregnancy has made me a bit fickle but I (and really, we) felt this was missing just a little something. My husbands answer to everything is cinnamon, though I did not oblige. I did end up needing more liquid than the recipe called for and used some beef stock I had on hand, though I think red wine would have been a better choice. Overall I think we came to the conclusion we can’t be cured of our carnivorism as we both agreed it needed some sort of meat. So, readers, cooks, play around with it. Tell me your takes. I had to add an insane amount of salt to get the filling to taste like a decent vegetable stew, but am hoping you all (especially you vegetarians) can help me out with some secret flavor weapons that can put this over the edge.

Filling:
1/2 cup lentils
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 ounce dried mushrooms, such as porcini, shitake or portabella
2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
8 ounces fresh mushrooms, sliced
1 medium onion, chopped
3 carrot, cut into 1/4-inch-thick rounds
2 teaspoons chopped fresh sage
1 teaspoon dried thyme
2 large garlic cloves, minced
3 tablespoons all purpose flour, divided
3 medium Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled, cut into 1/2-inch chunks
4 teaspoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1 tablespoon butter, softened

Crust:
1 cup plus 2 tablespoons all purpose flour
6 tablespoons yellow cornmeal
1 1/4 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
4 tablespoons chilled unsalted butter, diced
1/2 cup buttermilk
1 cup (packed) coarsely grated Gouda cheese

1 egg, lightly beaten

Filling: In a small bowl soak lentils for 10 minutes, then drain. Cook lentils in boiling salted water until tender but firm, about 20 minutes. Drain and set aside.

Pour 3 cups boiling water over dried mushrooms in medium bowl; soak 25 minutes. Remove mushrooms from soaking liquid, squeeze dry, and chop coarsely. (Reserve soaking liquid.)

Heat 1 tablespoon oil in heavy large skillet over medium-high heat. Add fresh mushrooms. Sauté 3 minutes. Add 1 tablespoon oil, onion, carrot, sage, and thyme. Sauté 4 minutes. Add garlic; sauté 30 seconds. Reduce heat to medium-low. Mix 2 tablespoons flour into vegetables; cook 1 minute. Add mushroom soaking liquid. Mix in remaining mushrooms, potatoes, soy sauce, and tomato paste. (If the mushroom liquid is not enough liquid I would add a cup or two of stock or red wine. I prefer a more stew-y filling and used stock though immediately regretted the muted mushroom flavor it caused and wished I had instead chosen wine.) Cover; simmer until potatoes are tender, stirring occasionally, 13 to 15 minutes. In a small bowl combine the tablespoon of butter and the remaining 1 tablespoon of flour with a fork until combined; stir the butter mixture into the stew until it becomes thick and rich. Add lentils; season with salt and pepper. Divide filling among four 2-cup ovenproof bowls.

Do Ahead: Can be made 2 days ahead. Cover; chill. Bring to room temperature before continuing.

Topping:Preheat oven to 400°F. Combine flour, cornmeal, baking powder, salt, and cheese in processor; blend 5 seconds. Add butter; pulse until mixture resembles coarse meal. Add buttermilk; pulse until dough forms moist clumps. Turn dough out onto lightly floured surface. Divide into 4 equal pieces; shape each into 2/3-inch-thick disk. Brush the edges of the bowls with the lightly beaten egg. Set rounds atop filling gently pressing the sides of the dough to the side of the bowl to seal. Cut air vents through crust.

Bake pot pies on baking sheet until tester inserted into biscuit topping comes out clean, about 30 minutes.

Conversions & Equivalents

Volume | Baking | Metric | Pan Size | Temperature | Oven | Other

1/2 teaspoon = 30 drops
1 teaspoon = 1/3 tablespoon OR 60 drops
3 teaspoon = 1 tablespoon or 1/2 fluid ounce
1/2 tablespoon = 1 1/2 teaspoons
1 tablespoon = 3 teaspoons or 1/2 fluid ounce
2 tablespoons = 1/8 cup or 1 fluid ounce
3 tablespoons = 1 1/2 fluid ounces
4 tablespoons = 1 1/4 cup or 2 fluid ounces
5 1/3 tablespoons = 1/3 cup or 5 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon
8 tablespoons = 1/2 cup or 4 fluid ounces
10 2/3 tablespoons = 2/3 cup or 10 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons
12 tablespoons = 3/4 cup or 6 fluid ounces
16 tablespoons = 1 cup or 8 fluid ounces or 1/2 pint
1/8 cup = 2 tablespoons or 1 fluid ounce
1/4 cup = 4 tablespoons or 2 fluid ounces
1/3 cup = 5 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon
3/8 cup = 1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons
1/2 cup = 8 tablespoons or 4 fluid ounces
2/3 cup = 10 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons
5/8 cup = 1/2 cup + 2 teaspoons
3/4 cup = 12 tablespoons or 6 fluid ounces
7/8 cup = 3/4 cup + 2 tablespoons
1 cup = 16 tablespoons or 1/2 pint or 8 fluid ounces
2 cups = 1 pint or 16 fluid ounces
1 pint = 2 cups or 16 fluid ounces
1 quart = 2 pints or 4 cups or 32 fluid ounces
1 gallon = 4 quarts or 8 pints or 16 cups or 128 fluid ounces
FLOUR
1 cup all-purpose flour = 5 ounces or 142 grams
1 cup cake flour = 4 ounces or 113 grams
1 cup whole wheat flour = 5 1/2 ounces or 156 grams
SUGAR
1 cup granulated white sugar = 7 ounces or 198 grams
1 cup packed brown sugar = 7 ounces or 198 grams
1 cup confectioners sugar = 4 ounces or 113 grams
COCOA POWDER
1 cup cocoa powder = 3 ounces or 85 grams
BUTTER
4 tablespoons = 1/2 stick or 1/4 cup or 2 ounces
8 tablespoons = 1 stick or 1/2 cup or 4 ounces
16 tablespoons = 2 sticks or 1 cup or 8 ounces
32 tablespoons = 4 sticks or 2 cups or 1 pound
1/4 teaspoon = 1.23 milliliters
1/2 teaspoon = 2.46 milliliters
3/4 teaspoon = 3.7 milliliters
1 teaspoon = 4.93 milliliters
1 1/4 teaspoon = 6.16 milliliters
1 1/2 teaspoon = 7.39 milliliters
1 3/4 teaspoon = 8.63 milliliters
2 teaspoon = 9.86 milliliters
1 tablespoon = 14.79 milliliters
2 tablespoons = 29.57 milliliters
1/4 cup = 59.15 milliliters
1/2 cup = 118.3 milliliters
1 cup = 236.59 milliliters
2 cups or 1 pint = 473.18 milliliters
3 cups = 709.77 milliliters
4 cups or 1 quart = 946.36 milliliters
1/4 teaspoon = 1.23 milliliters
4 quarts or 1 gallon = 3.785 liters
PAN SIZE VOLUME CAN SUBSTITUTE WITH
1 8-inch round cake pan 4 cups

1 8x4-inch loaf pan

1 9-inch round cake pan

1 9-inch pie plate

2 8-inch round cake pans 8 cups

2 8x4-inch loaf pans

1 9-inch tube pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

1 11x7-inch baking dish

1 10-inch springform pan

1 9-inch round cake pan 6 cups

1 8-inch round cake pan

1 8x4-inch loaf pan

1 11x7-inch baking dish

2 9-inch round cake pans 12 cups

2 8x4-inch loaf pans

1 9-inch tube pan

2 8-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 11x7-inch baking dish

1 10-inch springform pan

1 10-inch round cake pan 11 cups

2 8-inch round cake pan

1 9-inch tube pan

1 10-inch springform pan

2 10-inch round cake pans 22 cups

5 8-inch round cake pans

3 or 4 9-inch round cake pans

2 10-inch spring form pan

9-inch tube pan 12 cups

2 8-inch round cake pans

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

10-inch tube pans 16 cups

3 9-inch round cake pans

2 10-inch pie plates

4 8-inch pie plates

2 9x5-inch loaf pans

2 8-inch square baking dishes

2 9-inch square baking dishes

10-inch bundt pan 12 cups

1 9x13-inch baking dish

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 9-inch tube pan

2 11x7-inch baking dishes

1 10-inch springform pan

11x7x2-inch baking dish 6 cups

1 8-inch square baking dish

1 9-inch square baking dish

1 9-inch round cake pan

9x13x2-inch baking dish 15 cups

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

3 8-inch round cake pans

1 10x15-inch jellyroll pan

10x15x1-inch jellyroll pan 15 cups

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

2 8-inch round cake pan

1 9x13-inch baking dish

9x5-inch loaf pan 8 cups

1 10-inch pie plate pan

1 8-inch square baking dish

1 9-inch square baking dish

8x4-inch loaf pan 6 cups

1 8-inch round cake pan

1 11x7-inch baking dish

9-inch springform pan 10 cups

1 10-inch round cake pan

1 10-inch spring form pan

2 8-inch round cake pans

2 9-inch round cake pans

10-inch springform pan 12 cups

2 8x4-inch loaf pan

1 9-inch tube pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 11x7-inch baking dishes

2 8-inch round cake pans

8-inch square baking dish 8 cups

1 9x5-inch loaf pan

2 8-inch pie plates

9-inch square baking dish 8 cups

1 11x7-inch baking dish

1 9x5-inch loaf pan

2 8-inch pie plate

Water Freezes 32°F 0°C
  40°F 4.4°C
  50°F 10°C
  60°F 15.6°C
  70°F 21.1°C
  80°F 26.7°C
  90°F 32.2°C
  100°F 37.8°C
  110°F 43.3°C
  120°F 48.9°C
  130°F 54.4°C
  140°F 60°C
  150°F 65.6°C
  160°F 71.1°C
  170°F 76.7°C
  180°F 82.2°C
  190°F 87.8°C
  200°F 93.3°C
Water Boils 212°F 100°C
  250°F 121°C
  300°F 149°C
  350°F 177°C
  400°F 205°C
  450°F 233°C
  500°F 260°C
275°F = 140°C or Gas Mark 1
300°F = 150°C or Gas Mark 2
325°F = 165°C or Gas Mark 3
350°F = 180°C or Gas Mark 4
375°F = 190°C or Gas Mark 5
400°F = 200°C or Gas Mark 6
425°F = 220°C or Gas Mark 7
450°F = 230°C or Gas Mark 9
475°F = 240°C or Gas Mark 10

And for conversions that are not listed I found a great conversion calculator here!

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  1. This looks delicious! And at least you can use pregnancy as an excuse for drinking a gallon of eggnog…the rest of us will just have to look like little holiday piggies, I guess!

  2. That just looks fantastic. Your recipes and pictures are always so visually terrific. Come visit us. We have a wonderful mulled cider and a legacy cookbook.

  3. The best thing about my new coworker is his wife’s blog. I perused some of these recipes (not on company time, of course), and as a ‘shroom addict (not that kind), I just HAD to make this. Knowing that you two thought this was a bit lacking in flavor, I pulled out the vegetarian secret ingredient: vegetable bouillon cubes! I added two to the mushroom juice before dumping it in the vegetables. I also added some wine, but don’t think that was actually necessary. And then I added some spinach for color and iron. End result? DELISH. I’ll be eating the leftovers for days!

 

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