homemade ferrero rocher

December 28, 2011 | 7 comments

homemade ferrero rocher

First of all I want to thank you for the warm welcome you have given little Henry. He is quite smitten with us as we are with him, and it seems as if everyone else is too. I must be a mom because reading comments, and being stopped by a friend or random stranger and getting compliments on baking up something so sweet, precious and insanely cute never gets old.

And he is cute and adorable and every other cliche (but not really) adjective you want to use. Did I mention he is trying to suck his thumb (mama called that one), he snorts like a pig when he’s hungry, or that he has so much hair not a single person can walk past him without giving him a loving pet — which means we have bought stock in baby shampoo and have taken home a teeny tiny comb and brush set to make sure his locks stay in place (which have yet to obey us). Tsk, tsk, so unruly baby Henry!

hazelnut wafferscrushing
toasted hazelnutsadding gold

Not that we will ever blame him for his adorable cow licks and nap-static hair. He is just too cute. But while we are catching up, I almost hate to mention the fact that in addition to the world’s easiest pregnancy (did I mention, other than the insane lack of energy, I otherwise felt, err, not pregnant?) I also had a labor that would make most first time moms a wee bit jealous. Besides coming a whole day prior to his due date (he and I had a talk about this and we both agreed a prior eviction would be easier and more pleasant for us both) and the almost embarrassing moment of my water breaking at a friend’s birthday party, my labor lasted for a mere six hours and left me feeling like I could do it again real soon. (Though, I must shoot down rumors of us baking up a brother or sister for Henry any time soon. As good as he is, I think we will enjoy him a little bit before we start thinking about adding more awesomeness to the mix).

all mixedinside truffles
chocolate + hazelnutchocolate hazelnut coat
dipped and dryingferrero rocher

Luckily, before Henry decided to show up and make our lives so much better, I was able to make a peace offering for my ridiculously awesome labor and delivery nurses, thinking that I would need some sort of bribe in my assured 24-hour labor. Thankfully, I did not need a bribe or anything to make my 8-hour stay in the labor and delivery ward any better as everything went smoothly and quick, and thus these ferrero rocher became more of a thank you. And from what I hear (as I preferred snacking on infant feet and rolly polly legs) they were a hit — even the tin vanished.

christmas presents

One Year Ago: Buttermilk Pancakes + Pancake Tips

Homemade Ferrero Rocher
Adapted quite liberally from here

Makes about 100 balls

I do want to give a quick shout out to the awesome reader Judith. Ever since making these bad boys, I had been scouring different recipes sites to find a decent recipe for ferrero rocher and she sent me directly over here. Though it took 2 months for me to get around to making them, I and my husband (who insisted on tasting several for quality control purposes) and my/Henry’s nurses thank you.

Truffle:
3 cups crushed hazelnut wafer cookies (I used Pepperidge Farm’s Pirouettes)
3 cups roughly chopped toasted hazelnuts
1 1/4 cups (10 ounces) hazelnut spread, such as nutella

Coating:
1 cup dark chocolate chips
4 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 1/2 cups finely chopped toasted hazelnuts

In a large bowl combine wafer cookies, hazelnuts and hazelnut spread until combined (mixture will be a bit sticky). Refrigerate mixture for at least 30 minutes and then shape into 1/2-ounce balls (roughly a teaspoon-sized ball). Once balls are shaped place them the the freezer to harden. (Note: As I was forming balls, I had to frequently put the mixture back in the refrigerator because it got sticky fast.)

Once balls are formed and are hardening, melt chocolate and oil together in a double broiler. Once melted, remove from heat and stir in remaining hazelnuts. Let mixture cool down a bit, then, using a toothpick, dip each truffle into the melted chocolate and place on a baking sheet to harden. Once all truffles are dipped, place baking sheet in refrigerator to completely harden. After balls are hard, remove from refrigerator and let them come to room temperature before serving. If giving away, remove from refrigerator and wrap in festive foil and place in air tight container.

Balls will keep up to a week in an air tight container in the refrigerator.

Conversions & Equivalents

Volume | Baking | Metric | Pan Size | Temperature | Oven | Other

1/2 teaspoon = 30 drops
1 teaspoon = 1/3 tablespoon OR 60 drops
3 teaspoon = 1 tablespoon or 1/2 fluid ounce
1/2 tablespoon = 1 1/2 teaspoons
1 tablespoon = 3 teaspoons or 1/2 fluid ounce
2 tablespoons = 1/8 cup or 1 fluid ounce
3 tablespoons = 1 1/2 fluid ounces
4 tablespoons = 1 1/4 cup or 2 fluid ounces
5 1/3 tablespoons = 1/3 cup or 5 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon
8 tablespoons = 1/2 cup or 4 fluid ounces
10 2/3 tablespoons = 2/3 cup or 10 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons
12 tablespoons = 3/4 cup or 6 fluid ounces
16 tablespoons = 1 cup or 8 fluid ounces or 1/2 pint
1/8 cup = 2 tablespoons or 1 fluid ounce
1/4 cup = 4 tablespoons or 2 fluid ounces
1/3 cup = 5 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon
3/8 cup = 1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons
1/2 cup = 8 tablespoons or 4 fluid ounces
2/3 cup = 10 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons
5/8 cup = 1/2 cup + 2 teaspoons
3/4 cup = 12 tablespoons or 6 fluid ounces
7/8 cup = 3/4 cup + 2 tablespoons
1 cup = 16 tablespoons or 1/2 pint or 8 fluid ounces
2 cups = 1 pint or 16 fluid ounces
1 pint = 2 cups or 16 fluid ounces
1 quart = 2 pints or 4 cups or 32 fluid ounces
1 gallon = 4 quarts or 8 pints or 16 cups or 128 fluid ounces
FLOUR
1 cup all-purpose flour = 5 ounces or 142 grams
1 cup cake flour = 4 ounces or 113 grams
1 cup whole wheat flour = 5 1/2 ounces or 156 grams
SUGAR
1 cup granulated white sugar = 7 ounces or 198 grams
1 cup packed brown sugar = 7 ounces or 198 grams
1 cup confectioners sugar = 4 ounces or 113 grams
COCOA POWDER
1 cup cocoa powder = 3 ounces or 85 grams
BUTTER
4 tablespoons = 1/2 stick or 1/4 cup or 2 ounces
8 tablespoons = 1 stick or 1/2 cup or 4 ounces
16 tablespoons = 2 sticks or 1 cup or 8 ounces
32 tablespoons = 4 sticks or 2 cups or 1 pound
1/4 teaspoon = 1.23 milliliters
1/2 teaspoon = 2.46 milliliters
3/4 teaspoon = 3.7 milliliters
1 teaspoon = 4.93 milliliters
1 1/4 teaspoon = 6.16 milliliters
1 1/2 teaspoon = 7.39 milliliters
1 3/4 teaspoon = 8.63 milliliters
2 teaspoon = 9.86 milliliters
1 tablespoon = 14.79 milliliters
2 tablespoons = 29.57 milliliters
1/4 cup = 59.15 milliliters
1/2 cup = 118.3 milliliters
1 cup = 236.59 milliliters
2 cups or 1 pint = 473.18 milliliters
3 cups = 709.77 milliliters
4 cups or 1 quart = 946.36 milliliters
1/4 teaspoon = 1.23 milliliters
4 quarts or 1 gallon = 3.785 liters
PAN SIZE VOLUME CAN SUBSTITUTE WITH
1 8-inch round cake pan 4 cups

1 8x4-inch loaf pan

1 9-inch round cake pan

1 9-inch pie plate

2 8-inch round cake pans 8 cups

2 8x4-inch loaf pans

1 9-inch tube pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

1 11x7-inch baking dish

1 10-inch springform pan

1 9-inch round cake pan 6 cups

1 8-inch round cake pan

1 8x4-inch loaf pan

1 11x7-inch baking dish

2 9-inch round cake pans 12 cups

2 8x4-inch loaf pans

1 9-inch tube pan

2 8-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 11x7-inch baking dish

1 10-inch springform pan

1 10-inch round cake pan 11 cups

2 8-inch round cake pan

1 9-inch tube pan

1 10-inch springform pan

2 10-inch round cake pans 22 cups

5 8-inch round cake pans

3 or 4 9-inch round cake pans

2 10-inch spring form pan

9-inch tube pan 12 cups

2 8-inch round cake pans

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

10-inch tube pans 16 cups

3 9-inch round cake pans

2 10-inch pie plates

4 8-inch pie plates

2 9x5-inch loaf pans

2 8-inch square baking dishes

2 9-inch square baking dishes

10-inch bundt pan 12 cups

1 9x13-inch baking dish

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 9-inch tube pan

2 11x7-inch baking dishes

1 10-inch springform pan

11x7x2-inch baking dish 6 cups

1 8-inch square baking dish

1 9-inch square baking dish

1 9-inch round cake pan

9x13x2-inch baking dish 15 cups

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

3 8-inch round cake pans

1 10x15-inch jellyroll pan

10x15x1-inch jellyroll pan 15 cups

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

2 8-inch round cake pan

1 9x13-inch baking dish

9x5-inch loaf pan 8 cups

1 10-inch pie plate pan

1 8-inch square baking dish

1 9-inch square baking dish

8x4-inch loaf pan 6 cups

1 8-inch round cake pan

1 11x7-inch baking dish

9-inch springform pan 10 cups

1 10-inch round cake pan

1 10-inch spring form pan

2 8-inch round cake pans

2 9-inch round cake pans

10-inch springform pan 12 cups

2 8x4-inch loaf pan

1 9-inch tube pan

2 9-inch round cake pans

1 10-inch bundt pan

2 11x7-inch baking dishes

2 8-inch round cake pans

8-inch square baking dish 8 cups

1 9x5-inch loaf pan

2 8-inch pie plates

9-inch square baking dish 8 cups

1 11x7-inch baking dish

1 9x5-inch loaf pan

2 8-inch pie plate

Water Freezes 32°F 0°C
  40°F 4.4°C
  50°F 10°C
  60°F 15.6°C
  70°F 21.1°C
  80°F 26.7°C
  90°F 32.2°C
  100°F 37.8°C
  110°F 43.3°C
  120°F 48.9°C
  130°F 54.4°C
  140°F 60°C
  150°F 65.6°C
  160°F 71.1°C
  170°F 76.7°C
  180°F 82.2°C
  190°F 87.8°C
  200°F 93.3°C
Water Boils 212°F 100°C
  250°F 121°C
  300°F 149°C
  350°F 177°C
  400°F 205°C
  450°F 233°C
  500°F 260°C
275°F = 140°C or Gas Mark 1
300°F = 150°C or Gas Mark 2
325°F = 165°C or Gas Mark 3
350°F = 180°C or Gas Mark 4
375°F = 190°C or Gas Mark 5
400°F = 200°C or Gas Mark 6
425°F = 220°C or Gas Mark 7
450°F = 230°C or Gas Mark 9
475°F = 240°C or Gas Mark 10

And for conversions that are not listed I found a great conversion calculator here!

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  1. I was given a huge box of Ferrero Rochers for Christmas and was trying to figure out a way to make them at home! So glad I came across this!! LOVE!

  2. This is so genius!! And the photos are stunning!!

  3. Love the way you write, Meg! :) Thanks for this recipe, too. Henry’s in good hands with such a thoughtful Mama.

  4. How awesome. I never thought to make them! Gorgeous photographs!!

  5. I just made these! They were spot on!

  6. michaela davies  Thursday April 10, 2014

    If you put the mixture in another bowl filled with ice you keep it cool and saves you going to a fro from the freezer to make the balls.. I also put a tea towel over the ice to stop the top bowl moving around.. Hope it works for you x

  7. Soups, stews and casseroles are my farovite dishes to create. The ingredients are easily changed and modified to create subtle changes in textures and flavors.In high school my mother helped me make onion soup for my French class. It was an absolute hit. NO stock. Only fresh ingredients and water.I use a bouquet of herbs to add flavor and fragrance to my stocks, and was mentioned earlier, this is great for my veagen friends.

 

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